Tag Archives: Ivy Inn Princeton

Princeton’s One-and-Only Ivy Inn; Gourmet Hot Dogs in Lawrenceville; Excellent Lunch in Lambertville

Ivy Inn Princeton Echo

Ivy Inn, courtesy the Princeton Echo

Out-of-towners are always surprised to learn there’s something akin to a dive bar in toney Princeton. Even more remarkable, the place draws regulars from every economic, educational, and social strata in the area. On Saturday, August 6th, the Ivy Inn celebrated its 50th anniversary. Leading up to that I polled townies, visitors, and the Ivy’s owner, Richey Ryan, about its unique and lasting appeal. Here, in the August issue of The Princeton Echo.

Princeton University Eating Club Spawns Gourmet Hot Dog Eatery (Plus: NJ’s Own Hard Apple Cider Debuts and Jammin’ Crepes Readies Its First Truck)

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Tower Dogs, a casual eatery that opened in Lawrenceville in June, is a collaboration between the Tower Club’s longtime chef and a club board member. Chef Jim Forkel spent years perfecting his now-proprietary hot dog recipe, which is the star of a full-blown menu of gourmet dogs. Details here, in my “Food for Thought” column in that same August issue of The Princeton Echo. (Along with info on Ironbound Cider, named for the Newark neighborhood not far from where its NJ-grown apples are turned into hard cider, and on The Flying Crepeze, the truck that will start dispensing Jammin’ Crepes’ popular wares in the coming weeks.)

Annie’s Gourmet-to-Go: A Pleasant Surprise in Lambertville

I must thank food writer Susan S. Yeske for introducing me to Annie’s, where we shared a terrific lunch recently. Back in 2013 owner and chef Debra Caucci took over the spot on North Union Street that had been Ennis’ Market and named it after her mother. She serves fresh, from-scratch, generously portioned breakfast and lunch fare, both for eating-in and taking-out.

Annies porchetta sandwich

Porchetta Sandwich, Annie’s Gourmet-to-Go, Lambertville. Photo courtesy www.anniesnj.com

I was won over by her Sicilian porchetta sandwich of pan-roasted, properly herbed (and garlicked) pork, broccoli rabe, and sharp provolone on a warm, crisped ciabatta roll. For a side dish I chose m macaroni salad – made with small pasta shells, if I recall correctly – that took me back to my grandmother’s own. Not realizing the sandwich came with its own side, Susan and I had also ordered a wedge salad to share, and that, too, was fresh, generous, and perfected executed. (The menu board shown above isn’t quite up to date; among other things, a number of salads have been added.)

Annie’s is open everyday but Tuesday, with different hours on weekdays and weekends.

Princeton Dining Scene Explodes; Hopewell Gets a Food Hall; Interesting Wine Dinner Benefit in Morristown

If you think the opening of Agricola is the only restaurant news coming out of downtown Princeton, think again. In the Spring Dining Issue of US 1 I profile these latest newcomers:

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Mistral  Meet chef Ben Nerenhausen, who Scott Anderson hired away from 3-Michelin-starred Restaurant at Meadowood in Napa for his small plates byob. Nerenhausen explains why the NJ dining scene reminds him of Northern California (!)

DeSpana  Find out why this popular SoHo tapas cafe and market chose Princeton for its first satellite location

North End Bistro An American comfort food eatery from the growing Central Jersey restaurant empire of the brothers behind the Osterias Procaccini

Cafe 44 Fusion After a long absence, soul food returns to Princeton as a restaurant-within-a-restaurant – and with an unexpected legacy that extends back to the 1970s

Ivy Inn Princeton’s favorite (only?) dive bar becomes family friendly and serves fresh, casual, bargain-priced fare curated by chef Jackie Baldassari who recently did a star turn on Fox’s Hell’s Kitchen.

A First look at Brick Farm Market in Hopewell

This – Double Brook Farm‘s retail market – may have been a long time coming, but has been thoroughly embraced by the community in the short time it’s been open. I had never been inside its home, the old Malek Chevrolet building on Broad Street, but had always admired its gorgeous patterned brick facade, which dates back to the 1930s.

I was surprised by the sheer size of the interior, transformed into a glowing, rustic-chic food hall on two levels.

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The upstairs gallery (on the left, above) holds “shops” (really, counters) and a long dining bar with stools for those who want to eat in. The butcher shop features Double Brook Farm’s own meats from its sustainably raised animals. The next counter is chock full of charcuterie made from the same raw materials but transformed into dried and cured goodies by NJ’s estimable Salumeria Biellese. A creamery features ice creams and yogurts made with milk from Double Brook cows and cheeses from all over, overseen by Michel Lemmerling, who many customers recognize from his days behind the cheese counter at Bon Appetit in Princeton. (Sister-in-law Deeann Lemmerling is the market’s manager.)

Michel Lemmerling, Brick Farm Market

Michel Lemmerling, Brick Farm Market

On the street level, customers can dine at cafe tables just inside the door or out on the sidewalk after making their selections at the prepared foods arrayed in a large case that spans the rear. In charge here is chef Chase Gerstenbacher, who I profiled in this previous post.

Chase Gerstenbacher, Brick Farm Market

Chase Gerstenbacher, Brick Farm Market

The menu includes breakfast items (till 11 am) like steel-cut oats and a breakfast croissant with bacon, chorizo, or country sausage; “snacks” like housemade herb & garlic kettle chips, country pate, and mac ‘n’ cheese; “specialties” like sausage flatbread and pulled pork; and sandwiches and panini like the ones below, accompanied by salad of the day (here, pasta and kale):

Brick Farm Market's Roast turkey, rhubarb compote, baby lettuce on rye

Brick Farm Market’s Roast turkey, rhubarb compote, baby lettuce on rye

Brick Farm Market's brie, apple, and honey on baguette

Brick Farm Market’s brie, apple, and honey on baguette

One long wall is lined with more “shops,” including a full bakery (presided over by Karen Child, of the erstwhile Village Bakery in Lawrenceville) and a juice and coffee bar pouring Small World coffee and pressing fresh fruit and veggie juices.

Also for sale on this floor are fresh herbs, produce, and flowers from the farm, which is nearby, and finely curated groceries.

Slow Food Northern NJ’s 5-Course Wine Dinner to Benefit School Gardens Program

Who: The chef is Andrea Lekberg, chef/owner of the boutique bakery, The
Artist Baker, in Morristown. Lekberg has worked with Pichet Ong, among others, and her bakery was profiled in the NY Times in 2011.

What: 5-course tasting menu of local foods sourced from Mosefund Farms, Salumeria Biellese, The Urban Farm at Lafayette, The Community Garden in Morristown, and Valley Shepherd Creamery paired with wines from Beneduce Vineyards, Unionville Vineyards, and Hopewell Valley Vineyards.

Where: The Artist Baker in Morristown

Why: The funds raised will benefit the Slow Food Northern
New Jersey School Garden Program

When: You’ll have to hurry! It’s Friday, June 7th, at 7:00 p.m.

How: Tickets cost $80 for Slow Food Members whose membership is current is and $85 for non-members. A vegan or vegetarian option is available upon request. Tickets can be purchased through Brown Paper Tickets:
http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/368818.