Tag Archives: First Field ketchup

From Dishwasher to Exec Chef; Upcoming Events: 1 on Nature & Creativity & the other, Halloween Fun; News re Brick Farm Tavern & First Field Ketchup

3 Princeton Area Chefs Tell Their Stories of Working Their Way from the Bottom Rung to the Top of the Restaurant Kitchen Ladder

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For the 2016 Harvest Dining issue of US 1, I approached executive chefs at 3 of the Princeton area’s most popular and revered food establishments for the stories of how they navigated their way from the lowest to the top position. That all 3 are Hispanic immigrants with no English at the start speaks volumes. (Donald T***p please take note.) Read about the journeys of Juan Mercado of One53, Jose Lopez of Nassau Street Seafood, and Edgar Urias of Blue Point Grill here.

 

Nature-as-Muse Workshops at Princeton’s Mountain Lakes Preserve Feature Successful Perfumer, Food Artisan, Graphic Designer, and Poet

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Gab Carbone of the Bent Spoon, Courtesy Princeton Echo

The bad news is that this series of October workshops mounted by Friends of Princeton Open Space is sold out. The good news is there probably will be more to come. So if you’re interested in upping your creativity quotient, check out this unique series of open-air walks and a related workshop. Each is led by a different successful professional on four consecutive Sundays: a perfumer from Firmenich (scent), an independent graphic designer (color), a poet (words), and the inimitable Gab Carbone of the Bent Spoon ice cream shop (flavor).

I share all the fascinating details here, in the October issue of the Princeton Echo. Bonus: Get to know Princeton mover-and-shaker Fran McManus, the genius behind the workshops.

Halloween Fun for Grown-ups and New Milestones for Brick Farm Tavern and First Field (the NJ Ketchup Folks)

Food for Thought logoCheck out my “Food for Thought” column in October’s Princeton Echo for details on:

  • Tre Piani & Planet Apothecary teaming up for their Witches & Warlocks Ball
  •  Menu details for the upcoming (and already sold out) dinner at the Beard House by Brick Farm Tavern Chef Greg Vassos on October 22
  • The newest product from the First Field Jersey Ketchup folks which surprised even owners Theresa Viggiano & Patrick Leger in its popularity. (Hint: it’s not ketchup)

Uproot Review; Irish Julep Recipe; Agricola Opens; ‘Outstanding in the Field’ Comes to NJ; Edible Jersey Names Local Heroes

That’s a lot packed inside here – and yet there’s more. This post marks my 100th at dinewithpat! Thank you, thank you, thank you for the support and encouragement you’ve given me over the last 99. I’d be so grateful if you would help me celebrate by getting another food-loving friend to subscribe, or by following me on Twitter and Facebook. Yay me!

Uproot 2.0

This restaurant in Warren changed its focus and uprooted its menu (sorry; couldn’t resist) after its opening chef, Anthony Bucco, moved on to the Ryland Inn. Here’s my NJ Monthly review of the “new” Uproot, from the March issue. (Beer lovers will want to check out the cover stories as well.)

NJ Monthly cover mar13

For St. Patrick’s Day: No Green Beer Here!clipart shamrock

This year the folks at Salt Creek Grill in Princeton are saving us from that particular alcoholic monstrosity. Their alternative – the Irish Julep – is inspired. It’s made, predictably, with Jameson – but also with a particularly intriguing twist: Amaro Averna from Sicily. Here’s the recipe:

Salt Creek Grill's Irish Julep

Salt Creek Grill’s Irish Julep

Salt Creek Grill’s Irish Julep

1.5 ounces Jameson Irish Whiskey
¼ ounce Averna Amaro
½ ounce simple syrup
6 mint leaves
1 mint sprig
1/2 ounce water
Crushed Ice

Muddle mint leaves, simple syrup, and water in a highball glass.
Add crushed ice and Jameson Irish Whiskey.
Float Averna Amaro on top and garnish with mint sprig.

Breaking News on My Previous Breaking News: Agricola is Open

Agricola opening date

In my last post I reported that this long-awaited Princeton restaurant would open sometime in March. Well, that sometime is here: Sunday, March 10. Check out the opening menus at the Agricola website.

2 NJ Dates for ‘Outstanding in the Field’ Dinners

Last season, this company that mounts chef/farmer dinners around the country (and the world) in the middle of farm fields, on ranches, etc. did not hold an event in our fair state. This coming season, there are two of what they term “roving culinary adventures.” Tickets go on sale at the Outstanding the Field website on March 20th and, even at $200 a head, they sell out fast. Here’s a heads-up on the NJ dinners:

9/15 at Great Road Farm, Skillman (owned by Jim Nawn of Agricola). Chef is Josh Thomsen (Agricola) and farmer is Steve Tomlinson.

9/17 at Stonybrook Meadows, Hopewell (an equine and sustainable meats & produce farm). Chef is Laura Del Campo (an alum of elements in Princeton) and farmers is Anne Del Campo (her mom).

Congratulations to Edible Jersey’s 2013 ‘Local Heroes’

Here are this year’s award winners, selected by Edible Jersey magazine’s readers.  Well done & well deserved all. Cheers!

Sometimes you just gotta pop some Champagne.

Sometimes you just gotta pop some Champagne. (Photo credit: ganesha.isis)

River Horse Brewing Company, Lambertville (Beverage Artisan)
Matthew Gregg, Forty North Oyster Farms, Mantoloking (Farm/Farmer)
First Field, Princeton (Food Artisan)
Marilyn Schlossbach, Langosta Lounge, Asbury Park (Chef/Restaurant)
Basil Bandwagon and Natural Market, Flemington (Food Shop)
Hunterdon Land Trust, Flemington (Nonprofit)

A Blind Tasting of NJ Wines & Results of My Llama Meat Experiment

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The March issue of NJ Monthly is all about wine. As part of it I was invited to be a judge in and to chronicle a blind tasting of NJ wines. The heady group of experts I was thrown in with were:

*Sue Guerra, marketing director, Gary’s Wine & Marketplace

*Nicholas Harary, chef/co-owner, Restaurant Nicholas (and, btw, former sommelier at Jean Georges)

*Brian Hider, wine director, The Pluckemin Inn

*Tim Hirsch, wine consultant, The Wine Library

*Dr. Gary Pavlis, NJ wine expert & specialist, Rutgers University

*Sharon Sevrens, proprietor, Amanti Vino

*George Staikos, wine consultant, educator & proprietor of The Educated Grape

Click here to find out how we rated 50-plus white, red, and fruit wines submitted by 25 wineries from every corner of the state. The good, the bad, the ugly. And feel free comment here with your own opinion on the state of our state’s wines. Salute!

 As I reported in a previous post, I recently purchased two pounds of ground llama meat from WoodsEdge Wools Farm in Stockton. I cooked it three different ways over three nights, the upshot being that while some experiments worked better than others, I’m happy to make llama meat a part of my life. Why, you ask?

Well, it’s a tasty, lean red meat. As Jim Weaver of Tre Piani had told me, it does indeed resemble pork in texture. But it has its own unique flavor – pronounced but not overpowering, simultaneously tangy and sweet. The first night I made two versions of pan-fried burgers, one with only truffle salt and pepper. It was OK, but when I topped it with First Field Jersey Ketchup, the flavor rounded out beautifully. For the other version I smeared a plain burger (regular salt & pepper) with some herb butter I had left over from a salmon dish the night before. When the butter melted into the cooked burger, it was a match made in heaven.

The next night I created a quick-and-dirty Stroganoff of the llama, sauteed onions and sliced portobello mushrooms, and sour cream. The richness of the sour cream proved a perfect foil; I will never use ground beef for this weeknight go-to dish again.

With the remaining llama I made mini-meat loaves in muffin cups, adding bread crumbs, fresh herbs, minced red onion, an egg, a squirt of lemon juice, and (I’m a bit embarrassed to admit) one finely diced mozzarella stick. This was my least successful dish – bland and a bit dry – although more of that Jersey ketchup helped.

In the end, I realized that any recipe I now have for pork can be substituted with the same cut of llama. (I’m particularly keen to try stew.) Since llama has tons more flavor than most pork, while being leaner, I think it’s a win-win. And here’s a scoop: Plans are in the works at WoodsEdge for offering yak meat by the end of March.