Tag Archives: Cucharamama

NJ Boasts 4 JamesBeard Semifinalists!; Martha Stewart Coming to Bridgewater; Mauritian Fish Curry

2015 James Beard Award Semi-Finalists Announced

These Garden State culinary luminaries are nominees this year – including in two national categories:

For Outstanding Chef (in the U.S.): Maricel Presilla, Cucharamama, Hoboken

For Outstanding Baker (in the U.S.): Marie Jackson, The Flaky Tart, Atlantic Highlands

For Best Chef, Mid-Atlantic: Both Scott Anderson, Elements, Princeton and Joey Baldino, Zeppoli, Collingswood

Congrats & best wishes to them all!
Finalists will be announced on March 24 and the winners named on May 4.
Here’s the complete 2015 list of semifinalists in all categories.

Heads Up Martha Stewart Fans

clean-slate-cover_sq

She’ll be signing copies of her latest book, Clean Slate, on Thursday, February 26 at the Costco in Bridgewater. Ms. S. will be there at 2 pm but only for one hour, so good luck! For event info phone 732.584.1003.

Homemade Fish Curry from the Island of Mauritius (via Northern VA)

Do I hear you saying, “from where?” I explain the where, why, who, what and how below. (This post is excerpted from my In the Kitchen column in the 2/6/15 issue of the Princeton Packet.)

Of the many important things in life that we have little or no control over, our children’s choice of mate has to rank right up there. So my husband Bill and I counted ourselves among the fortunate in this regard when our elder daughter, Alice, married Chris Le last year. He is all anyone could hope for in a son-in-law. But the bonus for me, a food writer, is that Chris hails from a food-obsessed family with an interesting and unusual cultural background.

Alice & Chris Le

Alice & Chris Le

Chris’s father, Thanh Le, emigrated to the U.S. from Vietnam after the war. In Northern Virginia he met his future wife, Marie-Ange So Ting Fong, who was born and raised on the island of Mauritius, which is known as the Pearl of the Indian Ocean. Situated off the coast of Madagascar, Mauritius is the only place on earth where the dodo lived. In 2010, the New York Times lauded the island’s “perfect year-round climate, talcum-soft sands, [and] crystalline waters.” This tropical paradise is multi-ethnic and multi-lingual. Languages spoken there include Mauritian Creole, French, and English, as well as several Asian tongues.

Chris and his two brothers were raised on dishes that span the Vietnamese, Chinese, and Mauritian repertoire. While his father, Thanh, likes to grill and barbecue, the bulk of the cooking is done by his mother, Marie-Ange, and her mother, Josephine So Ting Fong, who lives with the family part of the year. This past Christmas Eve the Les graciously invited me and Bill to join their extended family for what turned out to be a veritable feast.

Le Family Christmas Eve 2014

Le Family Christmas Eve 2014

I lost count after 15 dishes had hit the table, among them dumplings, egg rolls, Vietnamese grilled beef skewers, noodle dishes, abalone, and pickled eggs. All were terrific, but there was one dish that I couldn’t stop eating: Mauritian fish curry. This turns out to be a deceptively straightforward combination of fried fish with onions, a couple of spices, and a splash of vinegar. It’s a curry in the broader Southeast Asian sense of something having been cooked in spices, which may or may not include curry.

Mauritian Fish Curry

Mauritian Fish Curry

Of course, the first thing I did when I got home was to google recipes for Mauritian fish curry. But the images and recipes that popped up were quite different from what I had enjoyed. The apparently more common version turns out to be a “wet” curry, with the fried fish bathed in sauce, often tomato based. The Les’ is a “dry” curry, its moisture derived mainly from the oil that the fish is fried in. So I asked Ms. Le and her mother for their recipe, which they kindly supplied. (As is typical in recipes handed down in families, no one had ever measured ingredients, let alone recorded it on paper.) The only constants among theirs and the other recipes are onions, garlic, and fish (usually white-fleshed) fried in vegetable or seed oil. Many include – besides the aforementioned tomatoes – fresh ginger, cilantro, and thyme. Some use curry leaves or curry powder, as well as cumin or garam masala.

The Le family recipe contains none of these. Instead, spoonfuls of saffron and mustard seed provide color and flavor. Ms. Le cautions, “I would suggest that you test the recipe and adjust the amounts according to your taste.” She also suggests using your personal favorite fish. For her, that’s thick fillets of boneless tilapia, although her mother prefers tilapia (or other fish) with bones intact, and her husband favors salmon.

The recipe below is straight from the Le family, with one deviation. Marie-Ange Le and her mother allow the uncooked fish, sprinkled heavily with salt, to sit at room temperature for four hours. (Other Mauritian recipes stipulate one hour.) This helps the fish to crisp up nicely and not fall apart in the pan. But food safety experts advise never to let raw seafood sit out at room temperature, so you can skip that step and either coat the fillets lightly with flour just before frying or simply follow your normal routine for frying fish fillets. The results won’t be the same, but still good.

Elizabeth & Ryan

Elizabeth & Ryan

By the way: There’s another Tanner family wedding approaching. In October our other child, Elizabeth, will marry Ryan Ritterson. Bill and I can hardly believe that we’ve lucked out here, too. Ryan, like Chris, is all we could ask for to ensure our daughter’s happiness. His ancestry, though, is far less exotic. He’s from solid Midwestern stock. I promise not to hold that against him.

LE FAMILY MAURITIAN FISH CURRY
Serves 8 to 10

3 pounds thick fish fillets, such as tilapia or salmon, cut into large pieces
Salt to taste
Oil for deep frying, such as peanut, soybean, or canola (not olive oil)
6 cloves chopped garlic
1 teaspoon powdered saffron, or 12 strands (1 gram) saffron, crumbled
1-1/2 tablespoons mustard seed
3 tablespoons white vinegar
2 white onions cut in quarters (or eighths, if large) and the slices pulled apart

  1. Wash and pat dry the fish. Salt the fish on both sides, to taste, and deep-fry the fish in oil as you normally do. Remove the fish and set aside, reserving the oil.
  2. In a small bowl mix the saffron with a little warm water.
  3. Heat one cup of the reserved oil and stir-fry the onions and garlic until the onions are soft and translucent but not brown. Add the saffron mixture, the vinegar, and a pinch of salt. Combine and turn off the heat.
  4. Immediately add the mustard seed, then the fried fish and gently combine. Turn the heat back to medium-low and cook only until the mixture is just heated through. (Make sure that you do not overheat the mixture at the end, or the mustard seed will turn bitter.)
  5. If the fish curry is too dry, add more of the reserved frying oil.

Beard Awards: Big-time Semi-finalists from NJ; Food Photography Lesson; Marvelous Meyer Lemons

Jersey Chefs Up for National & Regional Awards

I was thrilled to see 3 Garden Staters on the national lists and another 3 up for Best Chef, Mid-Atlantic among the semi-finalists for the 2014 James Beard Awards, which were announced earlier this week.

Maricel Presilla

Maricel Presilla

Marc Vetri

Marc Vetri

Congrats to Maricel Presilla and Marc Vetri for their nominations as Outstanding Chef in the U.S. – Presilla for Cucharamama in Hoboken and Vetri for Vetri in Philadelphia. But because he crossed river this year with Osteria in Moorestown Mall, I’m claiming him for NJ! I can’t stop myself from including another name here: Gabrielle Hamilton, who’s nominated for her work at her NY restaurant, Prune. But since she was raised in Lambertville, I’m labeling her NJ, too.

Ben Nerenhausen & Scott Anderson. Courtesy PrincetonInfo.com

Ben Nerenhausen & Scott Anderson. Courtesy PrincetonInfo.com

Congrats also to Ben Nerenhausen of Mistral in Princeton, who is nominated for Rising Star Chef in the U.S.

Congrats, finally, to these 3 who are among the 20 nominees for Best Chef, Mid-Atlantic region: Scott Anderson, Elements; Joey Baldino, Zeppoli; Lucas Manteca, The Red Store. What’s particularly gratifying to me is that all 3 restaurants are in the southern half of the state – Princeton, Collingswood, and Cape May, respectively – which has long played second fiddle to the more populous metropolitan areas up north.

A dandy showing! Good luck to all.

Want to improve your food photography?

Lord knows I need to! We’ll get the chance on Sunday, March 9th when professional photographer Frank Veronsky of Princeton Photo Workshop presents “Shoot It & Eat It” at Tre Piani in Forrestal Village. During the 3-hour class, guests will first photograph and then down a 3-course dinner. Click here for details and to register.

My Meyer Lemon Madness (with recipes)

(Adapted from my “In the Kitchen” column in the Princeton Packet of 2/28/14)

Meyer lemons 006

A few years ago I fell hard for sweet, floral Meyer lemons at San Francisco’s Ferry Building Farmers Market. At the time they weren’t regularly available around these parts, so my San Fran-based daughter, witness to my infatuation, thoughtfully gave me a dwarf Meyer lemon tree for Christmas. My sapling arrived months later, complete with excellent instructions for potting and growing, from Four Winds Growers based in Winters, CA.

Meyer Lemon brochure 002Here in Zone 7 the tree must winter indoors. It took three growing seasons, but this past summer mine produced 5 big beauties (pictured above) that ripened just before the first frost. (A 6th was still small and green; more on that later). I was so excited, I planned an entire dinner party for 4 guests around those 5 lemons.  For inspiration I turned to this L.A. Times article: “100 Things to Do with a Meyer Lemon.”

Here’s my menu:

Meyer lemon feast 013Nibbles & drinks: Marcona almonds; hefeweizen beer with slices of Meyer lemon
Main: Roasted monkfish with Meyer lemon salsa; basmati rice; zucchini and sliced Meyer lemons
Dessert: Meyer lemon-almond cake with Meyer lemon Chantilly cream

As you can tell, I stretched my quintet as far as it could go. I even used the lemon leaves for table decor. ??????????

Amazingly, the dinner did not result in Meyer lemon overload and, with one exception, was wildly successful. Beer and Meyer lemon is a match made in heaven, although it takes a few minutes for the lemon to assert itself. I chose monkfish for its dense, meaty, snow-white flesh, but found the salsa, which contained shallots and olives as well as the fruit, bitter and overpowering. Next time I’ll substitute the compound butter I’ve included in the recipe below. On the other hand, the combination of thin rounds of zucchini and even thinner ones of lemon sautéed together in olive oil was a revelation! I may never make zucchini without lemon again.

??????????Without a doubt, though, the Meyer lemon-almond cake, a variation on one of Claudia Roden’s, stole the show. It has the texture of a tea cake and is as simple to make. It’s good on its own, and its flavor even deepens overnight, but I felt compelled to gild the lily by adding Chantilly cream flavored with Meyer lemon.

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As to the fate of that last green fruit left on the tree: It continued to grow indoors, albeit at a greatly reduced pace. Just as it became full, ripe, and ready for plucking, this recipe from Bobby Flay for Meyer lemon potatoes the New York Times. It turned out to be the perfect coda to my Meyer lemon season.

ROASTED MONKFISH WITH MEYER LEMON COMPOUND BUTTER
Serves 4.

1-1/4 pounds monkfish, in one piece (tuna can be substituted)
Extra virgin olive oil
1 to 2 cloves garlic, sliced very thin
Salt & pepper, to taste
For the Meyer lemon compound butter:
1/2 stick butter, softened to room temperature
Zest of 1 Meyer lemon
1-1/2 teaspoons flat-leaf parsley, finely chopped
1/4 teaspoon fresh thyme, leaves only
Salt & pepper to taste

  1. Make the compound butter: Combine all ingredients in a small bowl. Mash and stir until well blended. Set aside.
  2. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Coat an oven-safe baking dish with oil.
  3. Make a series of small incisions on both sides of the fish, and insert a sliver of garlic into each cut. Rub or brush fish with olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper.
  4. Place fish in prepared dish and roast in preheated oven for about 15 minutes, or until just opaque and cooked through. Slice fish into thick, diagonal slices and serve with compound butter at room temperature.
    Serves 4.

Frank Bruni et al @ Princeton; Delish Dandelions; Menu Malfunctions; Maricel Does It Again

Bruni Speaks!

A few weeks ago Frank Bruni and other notable food memoirists – including chefs Gabrielle Hamilton and Anita Lo – spoke to a standing-room-only crowd at Princeton University. The topic was “Food, Writing, Intimacy” and each of the speakers, who also included chef Christopher Albrecht of Eno Terra and professor Leonard Barkan of Princeton, was given 10 minutes to talk about, well, anything they liked, followed by a short q & a.

Food Memoir Talk

Among the interesting information to emerge: Bruni will be teaching a course in food writing at the university next year and Hamilton’s memoir, Blood, Bones & Butter, is being made into a movie starring Gwyneth Paltrow. Here are some of my favorite moments:

Professor Barkan (author of Satyr Square): “I did not grow up in a culinary household, but my first girlfriend did. Eventually, I grew more interested in food than I did in her.”

Frank Bruni (Born Round) told how during his time as NY Times restaurant critic he would make reservations under a different pseudonym each week, often forgetting to come up with one until he was on the phone. Among the names he used, as he glanced around his office: Mr. Strunk, Mr. White, Mr. Fodor, Mr. Frommer.

Anita Lo (chef/owner of Annisa in New York and author of Cooking without Borders) started off saying, “I want to talk about identity and food.” Her father, she said, had emigrated from China, her mother from Malaysia. Her father died when she was three, so she was raised mostly by her mom and stepfather, who was of German extraction, in the suburbs of Detroit. Because her longtime nanny was Hungarian, chicken paprikash is now one of her comfort foods. “So,” she concluded, “I’m pretty much a WASP.”

Gabrielle Hamilton (chef/owner of Prune in New York and award-winning author) admitted at the start, “I would rather be boiled in oil than talk. I look forward to the q & a! My memoir, like my cooking, is reluctant and inadvertent. I wanted to be a writer, but a memoir is much too personal.”

To view the entire session on video, click here. (Be sure to catch Bruni, who is quite the raconteur, telling about his encounter with the soap dispenser at Nobu 57.)

Dining on Dandelions

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I sing the praises of this spring treasure in my latest In the Kitchen column for the Princeton Packet, including my recipe for the above dish and one for dandelion risotto from Anna Scozzari of Enzo’s La Piccola Cucina in Lawrenceville.

Lost in Translation, Menu Edition

My daughter Alice recently was awarded an all-expense-paid stay at the exquisite Live Aqua Cancun Resort in Mexico, courtesy of the extraordinary company she works for. In addition to raving about the oceanfront beach, 9 pools, daily foot massage in her private cabana, and other decadent offerings, she singled out a fantastic meal at MB. It’s the inhouse restaurant of Michelle Bernstein, the James Beard Award-winning chef whose flagship is Michy’s in Miami.  The food easily surpassed some rather…um…unfortunate menu descriptions. Goat cheese marbles, anyone?

Restaurant MB menu


Maricel Presilla Does It Again

Congratulation are in order yet again for Hoboken restaurateur Maricel Presilla. Her book, Gran Cocina Latina, just won the 2013 IACP award as Best General Cookbook.

Maricel Presilla of Cucharamama, Zafra, & Ultramarinos

Maricel Presilla of Cucharamama, Zafra, & Ultramarinos

Stay tuned to see how she and her book fare when the James Beard book awards are announced on May 6th. For the complete list of IACP winners, click here.

Interview in 2 Parts with Maricel Presilla; Tyler Florence Coming to Princeton

MARICEL PRESILLA on GRAN COCINA LATINA

Maricel Presilla is having quite the year. In May the grand dame of Hoboken’s celebrated Cucharamama and Zafra restaurants and Ultramarinos Latin store, who is also a scholar of medieval Spanish history and a cacao expert, was named 2012 Best Chef Mid-Atlantic by the James Beard Foundation. (Only the second NJ chef ever to achieve this milestone.) Then in October her 901-page cookbook, Gran Cocina Latina (W.W. Norton, $45), was published – and was instantly hailed as a groundbreaking, landmark magnum opus.

I interviewed Presilla about the book shortly after it was published (but before Hurricane Sandy damaged, but did not destroy, her restaurants). Part of the resulting Q&A is in the December issue of New Jersey Monthly, but because she is such a generous and genuine interview subject, our conversation far surpassed my allotted word count. So below is more of Presilla-on-Presilla, including how she went from medieval scholar to restaurateur, where the beautiful artwork that graces her book comes from, and her thoughts on the cuisines of Cuba – her native land – and Peru, the Latin flavor of the moment.

(Fans take note: On Wednesday, January 16, at noon, Maricel Presilla will be at the Beard House in Greenwich Village for a reading of Gran Cocina Latina. Books will be available for purchase and light refreshments will be served. Suggested donation is $20; the event is free for culinary students. Details aren’t up yet, but should be soon at jamesbeard.org.)

With everything you have going on professionally, why did you take on such a time-consuming, all-encompassing project as the book, which included travel over a period of three decades to 20 countries?
It was the other way around! The book came first, and led to everything else. I didn’t have my restaurants or store or even the cacao business when I started the research for this book. The book truly represents my life story; everything flowed from that. In my travels for what I thought would be my history book, I would collect recipes simply because I was a home cook and wanted to make them. I did this not knowing it would become a cookbook.

So then how did the restaurants come about?
The history book led to recipes which led to restaurants. My medievalist scholarship is how I got into cooking. When I decided I wanted to cook professionally, I wound up training at the Ballroom in New York. My mentor there was Felipe Rojas-Lombardi. His restaurant was the first full-fledged tapas bar in the U.S. – also the first to have quinoa on the menu. He died in 1991 and after I mentioned him when I won the Beard Award, a scholarship was established in his name. Through my work at the Ballroom I met my first well-known food writer, Paula Wolfert. I cooked Cuban conch fritters for her. She and I began talking about them, and I included the history of their ingredients and their evolution from pre-Colombian to creole – this was just part of our discourse. She then said I would be perfect to talk with Suzanne Hamlin, who was then a food writer for the New York Daily News. This was in 1983, and that was my first major exposure. Until then I didn’t realize I knew so much! I didn’t realize that it was part of my natural technique to include information like where a certain plant came from and why and how it became an important part of the diet.

Besides the sheer comprehensiveness – 500-plus recipes and a wealth of stories and historical background behind them – what sets Gran Cocina Latina apart from other Latin American cookbooks?
As big and scholarly as the book is, it brings traditional recipes into the modern home kitchen. Although they are my recipes, I don’t transform them into something unrecognizable. There are steps you go through when you bring the jungle into your kitchen. You have to tame it. It must still taste delicious but respond to the needs of the home kitchen. Another difference is that today we have a wealth of Latin ingredients that were not readily available before. I remember the days at the Ballroom when Felipe would have to settle for Mexican peppers when he was making a Peruvian aji dish.

Where will cooks be able to get the more exotic ingredients used in some of the recipes?
The food pictured in the book is all from New Jersey! The cover may look like it came from the jungle, but it’s from our New Jersey jungle! I love it that the Latins found a home here. It would have been impossible for me to find all the ingredients for the recipes in the book if I had been in, say, Mexico City or even Lima, and not as easy in Miami, where I would have had to drive for hours because the markets are so specialized. I mean, we are it! Here it’s more concentrated; we have more density. I have my choice of three small stores or one big one, like Food Bazaar, for one-stop shopping. It’s actually harder in New York, because it’s not as compact.

How long did the book take to produce?
You mean after the writing? One and a half years for copy editing the manuscript. There were three or four passes, plus photos, illustrations, etc.  I wrote the book in different stages. Each chapter took months. It took a long time. There was a period of intense work for two to three years when I wrote every day or nearly every day. Then I spent two years testing the recipes in my home. And retesting. And adding new ones as I discovered something new, as I myself changed and as I became a better writer.

Organizing this vast amount of material must have been daunting…
In this way, too, I drew upon my scholarly work. Medieval writers were organizers; they put things into categories, they labeled vast amounts of information – it comes out of Middle Ages scholasticism. I have this same spirit of how-do-you-make-sense-of-this. Every chapter has its own index. I focused on the underlying principles [of Latin cooking]. Because I wanted people to be able use the book in their kitchens, it’s classically structured. To tell the truth, I had a completely different organizational scheme in mind but my editor demanded that we use somewhat conventional categories. Still I asked, ‘Why should drinks appear at the end? We don’t serve them at the end of a meal, or only at the beginning, we drink with the meal! [“Drinks” is the eighth of twenty chapters.] I didn’t want rice to be in a chapter on side dishes or an afterthought. Rice is central to the meal! And those introductory chapters on the layers of Latin flavor are laid out just as people cook and eat. In a conventional cookbook, these would be the back matter. The structure behind the meal – that is basic to understanding. That theme was behind the organization.

The book’s artwork – photographs, line drawings, etc. – is stunning…
I have a room in my house devoted only to the photo materials for the book. Everything that was photographed, illustrated and used in the book is mine. The cover? All my stuff. I bought the basket from a woman in the Amazon.  Bookcase after bookcase is filled with slides, old prints and maps, video and voice recordings – anything I thought we could use. I could open a foundation with all the objects, all the research materials!

Is Cuban is still your favorite cuisine?
It’s not really a personal favorite. Of course, the food of where you come from shapes you, and that’s a good thing. And Cuban food has a backbone – a history of contributions by the Arawaks, African slaves and a lot of Mediterranean influences – and this backbone is helpful. It gives you a key to understanding similarities and differences of what’s going on in this vast universe [of Latin food]. I remember the first time I was in Honduras, having just come from Colombia. A Honduran chef was making comparisons to and contrasts with Colombian cooking, and that helped me understand. As I continued to travel to all these countries and experience the cuisine, it all became clearer with each step. For example, experiencing Orinoco River cooking and then going to the Amazon – all of a sudden, you see the similarities and the particularities.

Peruvian cuisine seems to be having its moment in the spotlight…
It should have been better known long ago. It’s here to stay. What happened was, the food first had to be rediscovered by the Peruvians themselves. There are now wonderful young Peruvian chefs coming to the U.S., and I am proud to say that I was the first to bring them here, through the annual Worlds of Flavor conference at the Culinary Institute of America. The CIA was instrumental in putting Peruvian food on the map.

I predict that Gran Cocina Latina will win major cookbook awards this year…
Well, I worked hard. It has the precision needed to make it a classic. My editor, Maria Guarnaschelli, would not allow it to be any other way. I appreciate her stern hand. This book made me who I am, sent me in all these different directions. My base had been Cuban-Caribbean. Now I’m more complete as a scholar, a cook, and a person.

Food Network’s Tyler Florence at Wegmans, Princeton

My personal favorite Food Network chef is coming to the Wegmans market at Nassau Park Boulevard for a book signing and discussion on Tuesday, December 4, from 5 to 7 pm. Guests will be able to buy an autographed copy of his new cookbook, Tyler Florence Fresh, which is being published that very day.

Details are sketchy, but it appears you must sign up in advance, in person. From Wegmans: “Reserve a spot to meet Tyler Florence for his book signing. Pick up your FREE book-signing voucher at the Service Desk. Limited vouchers available. One voucher needed per family(2 adults and children). Books MUST be purchased at Wegmans to attend the book signing.” To phone the Princeton store: 609.919.9300.

Maricel Presilla’s Magnum Opus; Centro Grille; Vincent Price @ The Orange Squirrel

Gran Cocina Latina: A Landmark Book from the Award-winning NJ Chef and Scholar behind Hoboken’s Cucharamama & Zafra

I hereby predict that Maricel Presilla‘s new book will sweep the next round of major cookbook awards. It’s a 900-page treasure trove not only of recipes – 500 of them from all over Latin America – but also, as I write here in my Princeton Packet column, an engrossing, beautifully written culinary and social history. At $45 it makes a great holiday gift.

Robbinsville Gets New Restaurant from a Veteran: 3rd Time’s a Charm?

Joe Immordino of Acacia in Lawrenceville has added a second, more casual restaurant to his stable. Here’s my profile  of Centro Grille from the October edition of The AdvanceCentro Grille,which Immordino calls “a restaurant for locals from locals” is situated in Robbinsville’s Town Center, in the space that had last been Poseidon and before that, Santino’s.

Horror-Film Star’s Culinary Side Featured at Halloween Dinner

Cropped screenshot of Vincent Price from the t...

Cropped screenshot of Vincent Price from the trailer for the film Laura. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I could not have been more tickled to learn of this Halloween’s themed dinner coming up at The Orange Squirrel in Bloomfield. As owner/chef Francesco Palmieri points out, “We all know Vincent Price as the King of Horror, but the master the macabre had a very interesting but lesser known side: he and his wife Mary were food connoisseurs.” In fact, they wrote several cookbooks together. Palmieri’s 6-course dinner draws from their Treasury of Great Recipes, but I am proud to say I am the owner of one of their more obscure works, Come into the Kitchen, which has become somewhat of a collectible.

Guests are encouraged to bring Vincent Price memorabilia and share stories. Writes Palmieri: “This will be an interactive dinner where Vincent Price movies will be shown, music played, and discussion welcomed. Guests should feel free to dress expressively.” For menu, details, and reservations, visit the Orange Squirrel on Facebook.

Jersey Wins Big at the James Beard Awards!

Maricel Presilla, Gabrielle Hamilton, and Ariane Daguin all strut their stuff at this year’s awards

Congratulations to Maricel Presilla of Cucharamama in Hoboken who was named Best Chef in the Mid-Atlantic region at Monday night’s Beard Awards. She beat out chefs from leading restaurants in Washington, DC, Philadelphia, and Alexandria, VA. She is only the second Garden State chef to be so honored. The first, of course, was Craig Shelton of the Ryland Inn. Presilla, with her partner Clara Chaumont, is also behind two other Hoboken establishments: the more casual Zafra and a gourmet food and goods shop, Ultramarinos.

Gabrielle Hamilton – a scion of the Lambertville restaurant family – was awarded the Writing & Literature prize for her biography, Blood, Bones & Butter: The Inadvertent Education of a Reluctant Chef. This is not the first time Hamilton, the chef/owner of Prune on NY’s Lower East Side, has been honored by the Beard Foundation. Last year she was named Best Chef: NYC. The James Beard Book, Broadcast & Journalism awards were given out last Friday.

Although Ariane Daguin of D’Artagnan, the Newark-based purveyor of gourmet meats, wasn’t up for any awards, she deserves a medal for fortitude. She distributed a pin with this message at the event, and it showed up on the lapel of Wolfgang Puck, for one:

As you probably know, California’s ban on foie gras is due to go into effect in July.

Congratulations to all three of these Jersey gals. Check out the complete list of Beard winners here: 2012 James Beard Award Winners.

Italian Bouillabaisse, Beard Nominees (Congrats to Maricel Presilla!) & Twitter

Cacciucco

Cacciucco (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Rarely do I fall as hard for a dish as I did for cacciucco – Italy’s bouillabaisse analog.  In my Princeton Packet column of 3/16 I write about how once I discovered it, it kept popping up everywhere I turned. Until finally I had to make it myself – and found a dandy recipe hiding in plain sight on my bookshelf, in Anne Bianchi’s wonderful book, Zuppa! Soups from the Italian Countryside.

And the nominees are..

The 2012 James Beard Awards finalists were announced just minutes before I’m posting this. A big congratulations and best wishes to Maricel Presilla of Cucharamama in Hoboken. Once again, she has made the final cut for Best Chef: Mid-Atlantic. And better luck next year to two other Jersey semi-finalists, Andrew Araneo of Drew’s Bayshore Bistro in Keyport and Michael Krikorian of Copper Canyon in Atlantic Highlands.

Last year, I included Presilla’s takeout shop, Ultramarinos, in this NJ Monthly story about chefs who have turned to retail.

Read my review of Drew’s Bayshore Bistro in NJ Monthly.

Read my review of Copper Canyon in NJ Monthly.

I have dined at the restaurants of three of the other four finalists in the Mid-Atlantic category and heartily recommend them. These include Cathal Armstrong of Restaurant Eve, Alexandria, VA, Johnny Monis of Komi in DC and Vikram Sunderam of Rasika, also in DC. The fifth nominee is also from our capital: Peter Pastan of Obelisk. Guess I’ll have to take a trip down to make it five for five!

In New York City the best chef nominees are Michael Anthony, Gramercy Tavern; April Bloomfield, The Spotted Pig; Wylie Dufresne, wd-50; Mark Ladner, Del Posto and Michael White, Marea.

Philly’s Vetri , long one of my faves, is in the running as the nation’s Outstanding Restaurant, and Tertulia in NYC is a nominee for Best New Restaurant. Here’s the complete list of all nominees in all categories. The winners will be announced on May 7.

I’ve finally joined the Twitter Universe! You can follow me at @DineWithPat. And tweet me so that I can add you to those I follow, or leave your handle here as a comment and I’ll follow up. Thanks!