Tag Archives: Beard House

Scott Anderson @ Beard House; 2 NJ Slow Food Winter Markets; “Somm” the Movie

Elements & Mistral’s  “Elements of Extraordinary” Dinner

Scott AndersonAfter being named James Beard Award semifinalist in 2013, Scott Anderson is following up with a dinner at the Beard House in Greenwich Village on February 20th at 7 pm.

Among 5 passed hors d’oeuvre  – served with Szigeti Gruner Veltiner Brut NV – will be caramelized onion-bone marrow cromesquis. Yeah, I had to look that one up, too: “A small ball of ground meat which differs from a croquette in that a croquette is dipped in egg and breadcrumbs rather than batter or caul fat.” To paraphrase Homer Simpson: mmm…..caul fat.

A 6-course dinner with matched wines follows. The full menu is here, but to get your taste buds going think Long Island surf clam, Scottish trout, salsify, smoke, squab, preserved persimmons, and NJ grains.

Element's Chicken & Waffle

Element’s Chicken & Waffle

Although the price to non-members is a hefty $170, I can tell you that every dinner I’ve attended at the Beard House over the years has been cheap at the price, since chefs invariably put their best foot (and food) forward – and the wine flows all night long. For info and reservations, click here.

It’s That Time Again: Slow Food Winter Farmers Markets

Slow Food Central SnailSaturday, January 11: From 11 am to 3 pm at Tre Piani restaurant, Forrestal Village, Princeton. Vendors: BeechTree Farm, Birds & Bees Farm Honey, Cherry Grove Farm, Chickadee Creek Farm, Davidson’s Exotic Mushrooms, Donna & Company Chocolates, Elijah’s Promise Bakery, Happy Wanderer Bakery, Judith’s Desserts, Nice & Sharp Knife Sharpening Service, Rocky Brook Farm, Shibumi Mushroom Farm, Trappers Honey, Valley Shepherd Creamery, WoodsEdge Wools Farm. Directions at trepiani.com ($2 suggested donation)

Slow Food SnailSunday, January 19: From noon to 4 pm at Frelinghuysen Arboretum, Morristown. Vendors: Appleridge Farm, Good Fields Farm, Bobolink Dairy & Bakehouse, Griggstown Quail Farm, Churutabis Farm, Plaid Piper Farm, Flint Hill Farm, Valley Shepherd Creamery, Tassot Apiary, Rogowski Farm, Donna & Company Chocolates, Best Fruit Farm, Degage Gardens, Lazy Susan GranolaZen Bakers, Lickt Gelato. Directions to arboretum here. ($3 entrance fee supports Slow Food NNJ’s school vegetable garden programs)

Recommended Viewing: Somm, a Jason Wise Documentary

Somm logoApparently food-and-wine biz folks didn’t care much for this 2013 film about 4 young sommeliers preparing for and taking the mysterious Master Sommelier exam, which has awarded only 170 diplomas over the last 40 years. But I rented it over the Christmas break and highly found it captivating. Take a peak at the official trailer and see if you don’t think it’s worth a look.

“Preppy Cookbook” Recipes; Agricola & Frog & Peach News;Tips for Berries & Oysters

Award-winning North Jersey Chef Keeps the Preppy Flame Alive. Literally.

Christine Nunn, whose previous restaurant, Picnic in Fair Lawn, garnered a rare three-and-a-half stars from me, has given birth not only to a new restaurant, Grange in Westwood, but also to her first book.

In The Preppy Cookbook, subtitled “Classic Recipes for the Modern Prep,” Nunn makes a strong case for the timelessness of the “prep” lifestyle, including the eternal merits of hollandaise, Hellman’s, and hangover hash browns. Alongside classics such as poached salmon and eggs Benedict are thoroughly modern, easy-to-prepare gems. Sara Moulton, a friend and fellow prep, wrote the introduction. The book won’t be released until August 27, but you can pre-order it here on amazon.com.

Preppy Cookbook

I couldn’t hold off sharing Nunn’s seasonal recipes for summer squash salad, savory peach compote, and roasted fruits with honey and walnuts. Find them and more  in my In the Kitchen column from the August 2nd issue of The Princeton Packet, and here:

SUMMER SQUASH SALAD
The Preppy Cookbook
by Christine Nunn

Zest and juice of 2 lemons
1/3 cup vegetable or corn oil
2 tablespoons honey
1 teaspoon dry mustard
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon black pepper
1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
8 small zucchini and yellow squash, about 2 pounds, unpeeled and rinsed well
1/3 cup pine nuts, toasted
2 ounces Parmesan cheese

  1. Place lemon juice and oil in a large bowl or blender. Whisk by hand or blend on low speed for 3 minutes, until emulsified. Add the honey, mustard, salt, and black pepper and whisk or blend on low speed until well incorporated. Taste for acidity and seasoning and add more salt and black pepper as needed. Stir in the lemon zest and the pepper flakes.
  2. Using a mandoline or a vegetable peeler, slice thin ribbons of squash into a large bowl. Once there are lots of seeds in the squash and a little flesh, stop and move on to the next squash.
  3. When ready to serve, add the dressing and the pine nuts and toss until evenly coated. Divide evenly among chilled salad plates and, with a vegetable peeler, shave the cheese over the squash.
    Serves 4 as a first course.

SAVORY PEACH COMPOTE
The Preppy Cookbook
by Christine Nunn
Nunn uses this one-step condiment to top breaded pork chops and pork roast.

2 ripe peaches, cut into 1-inch cubes
1-1/2 tablespoons Pommery mustard
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Mix all ingredients in a large bowl.
Serves 4.

ROASTED STONE FRUITS WITH HONEY & WALNUTS
The Preppy Cookbook
by Christine Nunn

8 assorted stone fruits, such as peaches, nectarines, plums, and apricots, halved
4 tablespoons butter, cut into 1-inch cubes
1/3 cup honey
1 cup dry-roasted walnuts
1 tablespoon fresh cracked pepper

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Lightly grease a 9 x 13-inch baking dish. Arrange the stone fruits, skin side down, in the dish and top with the butter.  Roast for 20 minutes. Remove dish from the oven and stir. Add the honey and stir again. Roast for 5 minutes more, until the fruits are softened and beginning to turn golden. Stir in the walnuts and the pepper. Serve immediately. (Top with ice cream if desired.)
Serves 4.

EAST ENDER COCKTAIL
The Preppy Cookbook
by Christine Nunn
“This refreshing cocktail [comprises] a triple threat of prep. It is named after a section of London (Britain, preppy), made with gin, the prep alcohol of choice, and a hint of mint that is slightly reminiscent of a mint julep (Southern preppy).” – CN

3 slices cucumber, plus one thin peel of cucumber for garnish
6 mint leaves
2 ounces gin
1 ounce fresh lime juice
3/4 ounce simple syrup
Ice cubes

Chill 1 old-fashioned glass. In a cocktail shaker, lightly crush the cucumber slices and mint with a muddler. Add the gin, lime juice, simple syrup, and a handful of ice cubes. Shake well. Strain into the chilled glass. Float the cucumber peel on top.
Makes 1 drink.

Agricola Opening for Lunch

This restaurant that has taken Princeton by storm is finally adding lunch hours, starting August 8th (after the restaurant takes a 2-day hiatus). Here’s a taste of what’s on the menu:

Great Road Farms Heirloom Tomato Salad (watermelon, lemon cucumbers, almond hummus)
Cobb Salad (Valley Shepherd blue cheese, grilled chicken, house-cured bacon, avocado, Great Road Farm tomatoes & hard-boiled eggs)
Housemade Veggie Pita (whole grain pita, quinoa, cauliflower, carrot, cucumber, sprouts, eggplant, lemon herb vinaigrette)
The Standby (Cup of tomato soup, grilled house-smoked ham & cheese sandwich)

Josh Thomsen

Josh Thomsen

Josh Thomsen, Agricola’s executive chef, will be cooking at the Beard House this Tuesday night (August 6). Among the hyper-local treats this French Laundry alum will be serving up for his Rustic Farmhouse Feast are Great Road Farm egg custard with sweet corn and summer truffles and Cape May day boat scallops with fingerling potato-bacon cake, shaved apples, fennel, and mustard vinaigrette. www.jamesbeard.


Super Lunch Deal at The Frog & The Peach

Through Labor Day, chef/owner Bruce Lefebvre is offering this spectacular 3-course lunch for only $19 at his popular New Brunswick restaurant:

Frog & Peach: Black Truffle Gnocchi

Frog & Peach: Black Truffle Gnocchi

FIRST COURSE: Heirloom Tomato Salad (House Smoked Berkshire Bacon, Organic Bibb, Spiced Pignoli, Aged Cheddar Emulsion) or Black Truffle Ricotta Gnocchi (Cremini, Buffalo Mozzarella, Basil Pesto)

SECOND COURSE: Pan Roasted Griggstown Chicken (Smoked Pecans, Sweet Potato, Pickled Bell Peppers, Bourbon Pan Sauce) or Grilled New Jersey Monkfish (Gigante Beans, Fennel, Pancetta, Tuscan Kale
Littleneck Clam Red Sauce)

THIRD COURSE: Coconut Semifreddo (Caramel, Chocolate Croquettes) or Valdeon Cheese (Leon, Spain: Cow/Goat Blue, Wrapped in Oak Leaves
Endive Marmalade, Pistachios)

The $19 cost excludes beverages, tax and gratuity. The same menu is offered for dinner at $42. www.frogandthepeach.com

Helpful Tip #1: Keeping Berries Fresher Longer

Photo by George Point

Photo by George Point

The following excellent advice comes directly from the newsletter of the West Windsor Community Farmers Market. Thanks, manager Chris Cirkus and crew!

If you aren’t planning to eat your berries the day you bring them home from the Market, here’s a simple tip that works like a charm to keep them from getting moldy…give them a vinegar bath!

  • 1 TBS organic apple cider vinegar
  • 10 TBS filtered water
  • Fresh berries

Prepare the mixture in a large bowl. Place your berry beauties in the mixture and swirl around. Drain, rinse; although not necessary to rinse as the mixture is so diluted that you can’t taste the vinegar. Place your washed berries in the fridge in a covered container.

The vinegar kills any mold spores and other bacteria that may linger on the surface of the berries. Raspberries will last a week or more. Strawberries go almost two weeks without getting moldy and soft.

Helpful Tip #2: An Easier Way to Shuck Oysters

Courtesy of Tre Piani restaurant

Courtesy of Tre Piani restaurant

I haven’t tried this method yet, but it comes via the innovative, reliable folks at chefsteps.com. I profiled ChefSteps, the free online cooking school from key members of the team behind Modernist Cuisine, a while back at njmonthly.com, and since that time the school has amassed 12,477 students/users. Here’s the step-by-step for oysters.

Interview in 2 Parts with Maricel Presilla; Tyler Florence Coming to Princeton

MARICEL PRESILLA on GRAN COCINA LATINA

Maricel Presilla is having quite the year. In May the grand dame of Hoboken’s celebrated Cucharamama and Zafra restaurants and Ultramarinos Latin store, who is also a scholar of medieval Spanish history and a cacao expert, was named 2012 Best Chef Mid-Atlantic by the James Beard Foundation. (Only the second NJ chef ever to achieve this milestone.) Then in October her 901-page cookbook, Gran Cocina Latina (W.W. Norton, $45), was published – and was instantly hailed as a groundbreaking, landmark magnum opus.

I interviewed Presilla about the book shortly after it was published (but before Hurricane Sandy damaged, but did not destroy, her restaurants). Part of the resulting Q&A is in the December issue of New Jersey Monthly, but because she is such a generous and genuine interview subject, our conversation far surpassed my allotted word count. So below is more of Presilla-on-Presilla, including how she went from medieval scholar to restaurateur, where the beautiful artwork that graces her book comes from, and her thoughts on the cuisines of Cuba – her native land – and Peru, the Latin flavor of the moment.

(Fans take note: On Wednesday, January 16, at noon, Maricel Presilla will be at the Beard House in Greenwich Village for a reading of Gran Cocina Latina. Books will be available for purchase and light refreshments will be served. Suggested donation is $20; the event is free for culinary students. Details aren’t up yet, but should be soon at jamesbeard.org.)

With everything you have going on professionally, why did you take on such a time-consuming, all-encompassing project as the book, which included travel over a period of three decades to 20 countries?
It was the other way around! The book came first, and led to everything else. I didn’t have my restaurants or store or even the cacao business when I started the research for this book. The book truly represents my life story; everything flowed from that. In my travels for what I thought would be my history book, I would collect recipes simply because I was a home cook and wanted to make them. I did this not knowing it would become a cookbook.

So then how did the restaurants come about?
The history book led to recipes which led to restaurants. My medievalist scholarship is how I got into cooking. When I decided I wanted to cook professionally, I wound up training at the Ballroom in New York. My mentor there was Felipe Rojas-Lombardi. His restaurant was the first full-fledged tapas bar in the U.S. – also the first to have quinoa on the menu. He died in 1991 and after I mentioned him when I won the Beard Award, a scholarship was established in his name. Through my work at the Ballroom I met my first well-known food writer, Paula Wolfert. I cooked Cuban conch fritters for her. She and I began talking about them, and I included the history of their ingredients and their evolution from pre-Colombian to creole – this was just part of our discourse. She then said I would be perfect to talk with Suzanne Hamlin, who was then a food writer for the New York Daily News. This was in 1983, and that was my first major exposure. Until then I didn’t realize I knew so much! I didn’t realize that it was part of my natural technique to include information like where a certain plant came from and why and how it became an important part of the diet.

Besides the sheer comprehensiveness – 500-plus recipes and a wealth of stories and historical background behind them – what sets Gran Cocina Latina apart from other Latin American cookbooks?
As big and scholarly as the book is, it brings traditional recipes into the modern home kitchen. Although they are my recipes, I don’t transform them into something unrecognizable. There are steps you go through when you bring the jungle into your kitchen. You have to tame it. It must still taste delicious but respond to the needs of the home kitchen. Another difference is that today we have a wealth of Latin ingredients that were not readily available before. I remember the days at the Ballroom when Felipe would have to settle for Mexican peppers when he was making a Peruvian aji dish.

Where will cooks be able to get the more exotic ingredients used in some of the recipes?
The food pictured in the book is all from New Jersey! The cover may look like it came from the jungle, but it’s from our New Jersey jungle! I love it that the Latins found a home here. It would have been impossible for me to find all the ingredients for the recipes in the book if I had been in, say, Mexico City or even Lima, and not as easy in Miami, where I would have had to drive for hours because the markets are so specialized. I mean, we are it! Here it’s more concentrated; we have more density. I have my choice of three small stores or one big one, like Food Bazaar, for one-stop shopping. It’s actually harder in New York, because it’s not as compact.

How long did the book take to produce?
You mean after the writing? One and a half years for copy editing the manuscript. There were three or four passes, plus photos, illustrations, etc.  I wrote the book in different stages. Each chapter took months. It took a long time. There was a period of intense work for two to three years when I wrote every day or nearly every day. Then I spent two years testing the recipes in my home. And retesting. And adding new ones as I discovered something new, as I myself changed and as I became a better writer.

Organizing this vast amount of material must have been daunting…
In this way, too, I drew upon my scholarly work. Medieval writers were organizers; they put things into categories, they labeled vast amounts of information – it comes out of Middle Ages scholasticism. I have this same spirit of how-do-you-make-sense-of-this. Every chapter has its own index. I focused on the underlying principles [of Latin cooking]. Because I wanted people to be able use the book in their kitchens, it’s classically structured. To tell the truth, I had a completely different organizational scheme in mind but my editor demanded that we use somewhat conventional categories. Still I asked, ‘Why should drinks appear at the end? We don’t serve them at the end of a meal, or only at the beginning, we drink with the meal! [“Drinks” is the eighth of twenty chapters.] I didn’t want rice to be in a chapter on side dishes or an afterthought. Rice is central to the meal! And those introductory chapters on the layers of Latin flavor are laid out just as people cook and eat. In a conventional cookbook, these would be the back matter. The structure behind the meal – that is basic to understanding. That theme was behind the organization.

The book’s artwork – photographs, line drawings, etc. – is stunning…
I have a room in my house devoted only to the photo materials for the book. Everything that was photographed, illustrated and used in the book is mine. The cover? All my stuff. I bought the basket from a woman in the Amazon.  Bookcase after bookcase is filled with slides, old prints and maps, video and voice recordings – anything I thought we could use. I could open a foundation with all the objects, all the research materials!

Is Cuban is still your favorite cuisine?
It’s not really a personal favorite. Of course, the food of where you come from shapes you, and that’s a good thing. And Cuban food has a backbone – a history of contributions by the Arawaks, African slaves and a lot of Mediterranean influences – and this backbone is helpful. It gives you a key to understanding similarities and differences of what’s going on in this vast universe [of Latin food]. I remember the first time I was in Honduras, having just come from Colombia. A Honduran chef was making comparisons to and contrasts with Colombian cooking, and that helped me understand. As I continued to travel to all these countries and experience the cuisine, it all became clearer with each step. For example, experiencing Orinoco River cooking and then going to the Amazon – all of a sudden, you see the similarities and the particularities.

Peruvian cuisine seems to be having its moment in the spotlight…
It should have been better known long ago. It’s here to stay. What happened was, the food first had to be rediscovered by the Peruvians themselves. There are now wonderful young Peruvian chefs coming to the U.S., and I am proud to say that I was the first to bring them here, through the annual Worlds of Flavor conference at the Culinary Institute of America. The CIA was instrumental in putting Peruvian food on the map.

I predict that Gran Cocina Latina will win major cookbook awards this year…
Well, I worked hard. It has the precision needed to make it a classic. My editor, Maria Guarnaschelli, would not allow it to be any other way. I appreciate her stern hand. This book made me who I am, sent me in all these different directions. My base had been Cuban-Caribbean. Now I’m more complete as a scholar, a cook, and a person.

Food Network’s Tyler Florence at Wegmans, Princeton

My personal favorite Food Network chef is coming to the Wegmans market at Nassau Park Boulevard for a book signing and discussion on Tuesday, December 4, from 5 to 7 pm. Guests will be able to buy an autographed copy of his new cookbook, Tyler Florence Fresh, which is being published that very day.

Details are sketchy, but it appears you must sign up in advance, in person. From Wegmans: “Reserve a spot to meet Tyler Florence for his book signing. Pick up your FREE book-signing voucher at the Service Desk. Limited vouchers available. One voucher needed per family(2 adults and children). Books MUST be purchased at Wegmans to attend the book signing.” To phone the Princeton store: 609.919.9300.